• For Our Brothers And Sisters Who Have Died. To Our Brothers And Sisters Who Have Killed Them.

    I’m sick of the shit in our world.
    The pain and blame of self-serving crusades
    Armed with money, religion, power or fame,
    Cut out our hearts while gorging our guts
    To enslave us in fear and ensnare us in lust.
    Beauty’s around but its song is drowned
    By the bombastic rants of political bands
    Who manipulate justice to suit our demands.
    I’m sick of the shit in our world.

    I’m sick of the shit in our world.
    The twisted faces of the poor diseased
    Welcome sweet death as their hasty reprieve
    From a lifetime of fire, famine, and flood
    Consuming all hope and spoiling their blood.
    Our mother’s disowned us, we stripped her bare,
    Ungrateful children, too complicit to care
    About the bleak future our offspring will share.
    I’m sick of the shit in our world.
     
    I’m sick of the shit in our world.
    The stressed and depressed, oft alone in distress,
    Seek asylum in figments that never redress
    The persistent trauma of the race that they run,
    So they corrode and erode, works of art left undone.
    We fragile wonders are too oft torn asunder
    By inherited bias, guilt, and great greed,
    Too often conflating our wants with our needs.
    I’m sick of the shit in our world.

    I’m sick of the shit in our world.
    Neither ignorant beasts nor omnipotent gods,
    Related to these, but we’re neither extreme,
    Yet extremism reigns, conscripting our sons,
    Kidnapping our daughters, beheading our friends.
    We continue to fall even as we evolve,
    Saints turned to devils, no will to resolve
    The plague of pride at the root of it all.
    I’m sick of the shit in our world.

    Is there a remedy for our primal blight?
    For darkness in chests robbing eyes of their sight?
    Is there a remedy for our primal blight?
    For delivering slaves from their self-imposed night?
    Is there a remedy?
    Is there a remedy?
    Is there a remedy?
    Is there a remedy?

    And she replied,

    We have what we need for our world.
    Long ago man was entrusted a gift:
    Light dawned in the dark but fear smothered it.
    Let light break again, unfazed by our plight,
    And burst forth to disperse our self-imposed night.
    Illumine our hearts and enlighten our minds,
    Expose buried truth in our nature to find
    The question that sparks the rebirth of mankind.
    We are what we need for our world.

    We are what we need for our world.
    Mythical creatures made to steward the good,
    To ourselves unknown, and so, misunderstood,
    We’re always becoming but never to be,
    One turned to many to restore unity.
    Little is stable and less in control
    For disparate parts being equal in whole,
    Who must work together to reach their same goal.
    We are what we need for our world.

    We are what we need for our world.
    The light reveals what our conceit obscures,
    We are, mysteriously, the cause and the cure;
    Destroyer of life when devoid of what’s right
    Or builder of worlds when filled by the light.
    So let’s build a world where hope knows no shame,
    Where malice can’t flow through shared blood in our veins,
    And no one’s a foe since we bear the same name.
    We are what we need for our world.

    We are what we need for our world.
    May new vision give voice to the mass of men
    Quietly desperate, to have hope again
    That justice will reign and peace we will find
    On this rock that’s been dropped in the sea of spacetime.
    Willingly sacrifice falsehood to cultivate
    Courage to combat the fear that drives hate
    And our world in time will regenerate.
    Love’s what we need for our world.

    We are the remedy for our primal blight,
    For darkness in chests robbing eyes of their sight.
    We are the remedy for our primal blight,
    For delivering slaves from our self-imposed night.
    We are the remedy.
    Light is the remedy.
    We are the remedy.
    Love is the remedy.

    Solomon John, 2016
  • Comments on this post (0 comments)

  • Leave a comment

Added to cart

c